The Monologue of a Young Indian Man Struggling with Mental Health: Prologue

The Monologue of a Young Indian Man Struggling with Mental Health Issues is a fictional story of Daniyal: a 20-year-old young Indian man struggling with mental health, OCD in particular. Written by Mohammed Arai, this story is narrated in different parts, with each part focusing on various aspects of Daniyal’s life.  

The author, through Daniyal’s fictional tale, intends to address the taboo topic of mental health within the Indian community. Although fictional in the broader context, Daniyal’s story is no different to one of an average, young Indian man whose struggle with mental health is amplified simply due to the stigma attached to it.  

As a victim of OCD himself, the author understands the need to address the issue of mental health amongst the youth belonging to the Indian community, with greater-than-ever urgency to break the stigma attached to it.

The author understands the sensitive nature of the topic and is well aware that the sentiments of some Indian uncles and aunties may be incapacitated through his efforts to destigmatize mental health within the Indian community, but the author fully accepts the responsibility to not give a damn about the sentiments of such insensitive and apathetic individuals.

The story, names, characters, and incidents portrayed in Daniyal’s story are fictitious, however, they are, in fact, inspired by the abysmal and lamentable attitude of the Indian community towards victims of mental health. For this, the author unapologetically and defiantly narrates Daniyal’s story whilst criticising and condemning certain members of the Indian community (and others) for the role they play in stigmatising mental health.

The author is immensely grateful to Ms. Simra Mariam, Editor-in-Chief at Reclamation Magazine, for the opportunity to utilise this platform to narrate Daniyal’s story, whilst attempting to destigmatize mental health issues simultaneously.

Lastly, the author thanks Miss. Misba Khan wholeheartedly for agreeing to edit his work amidst her final year of architectural studies. And, as Stephen King once wrote: “To write is human, to edit is divine.”