Hair We Go Again: My Relationship With My Body Hair Through The Years

As a young girl, I would stare at the hair covering my legs, trying to wish it all away, imagining how smooth my legs would be without it. I would dream of the day when I would be old enough to start waxing or shaving, or do anything that’ll make my body hair disappear. My eyebrows were thick, I had what people loved to call a moustache (and have now simply started addressing as ‘upper lip hair’—surprise, surprise, it’s still a moustache) and my hands and legs were just as hairy.

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The Bollywood Effect: Women in Indian Cinema

From Saira Banu to Sonam Kapoor, Bollywood, the Indian film fraternity, has been a part of Indian society for more than 106 years. In recent years, however, Bollywood has become an integral division of Indian society. It has become a source that has a large impact on the thoughts, dreams, and goals of the Indian…

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Femicide In Canada: Enough Is Enough

Femicide is described as “the killing of one or more females, primarily by males because they are female. It represents the extreme end of violence and discrimination against women and girls.” The Canadian Femicide Observatory for Justice and Accountability website states that: “One woman or girl is killed every other day, on average, somewhere in…

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The “F” Word: Feminism in Pakistan

Pakistan is a predominantly Muslim country — Islam itself has given Muslim women many rights and so has Prophet Muhammad (may peace and blessings be upon him), but why does the nation fear feminism so much? When the word feminism is even uttered many roll their eyes, but such people have only have seen and…

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Mountain out of a Molehill: The M&S Hijab Controversy

The recent Twitter furor in reaction to news of Marks & Spencer selling school hijabs.   Maajid Nawaz took to Twitter to argue that British high street retailer Marks & Spencer “facilitates medievalism” by selling hijabs under the “school uniform” category. But this suggests that Nawaz is aware of the exact circumstances surrounding young girls…

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Toxic Masculinity: A Plague Across South Asia

(Image Credit: Metro.co.uk) Toxic masculinity has always been prevalent in South-Asian society. As young children, boys are told immediately to stop “crying like girls” — taught that any feminine act can shatter their entire masculinity and, that because they are boys, they are not allowed to show any signs of weakness or emotion. As these…

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